How Speech-Language Pathologists Use Orofacial Myofunctional Therapy

Orofacial Myofunctional Therapy Richmond, TX

Orofacial myofunctional therapy is used to treat disorders that lie in the mouth and facial area. The majority of the disorders display themselves as abnormal patterns of movement. A few examples include thumb sucking, tongue thrust, resting with the lips spread open, and pushing the tongue against the teeth while resting. 

While orofacial myofunctional disorders contribute to dental and breathing problems, they can also have a serious effect on speech. When the mouth does not function the way that it is supposed to, the result may be difficulty pronouncing certain words or lisps, both of which require intense therapy to address. Continue reading to find out more about orofacial myofunctional therapy

Orofacial myofunctional therapy for speech disorders

The following information outlines how speech-language pathologists use orofacial myofunctional therapy to address certain speech disorders.

Relevant speech disorders

Orofacial myofunctional disorders can cause speech problems if the tongue and lips become improperly positioned. When not tackled in a timely manner, the problems may become permanent, which is why therapy is needed. Below are a few of the most common speech problems that result from orofacial myofunctional disorders. 

  • Difficulty articulating or pronouncing certain words or letters
  • Lisps, which can cause speech to sound altered or improper

How orofacial myofunctional therapy is used

Once any medical concerns associated with orofacial myofunctional disorders are tackled, then a speech pathologist can come in to determine the best course of therapy. Speech pathologists may do the following during orofacial myofunctional therapy.

  • Encourage the individual to articulate sounds in a clear and precise manner
  • Implement tongue movement techniques 
  • Require the individual to practice breathing so that it matches up with speech 
  • Ask the individual to get comfortable with where and how the tongue and lips are supposed to be held and positioned
  • Request an alteration when it comes to chewing and swallowing, as both can contribute to OMD

The practices listed above are just a few that a speech pathologist may use when administering orofacial myofunctional therapy. Of course, each individual will have varying needs. However, over the course of therapy, the goal is to refine speech and eliminate any behaviors that may be contributing to the disorder and inability to properly communicate. 

The role of a speech pathologist

A speech pathologist studies everything related to the mouth, including how it functions. When it comes to OMDs, speech pathologists are able to use the diagnosed problem to determine what type of therapy is needed. For example, if the tongue rests improperly then the speech pathologist may recommend practices where the letter S is annunciated multiple times. 

Get started with therapy

When struggling with an orofacial myofunctional disorder, it is a good idea to consult with a speech pathologist. While the disorder itself may require the assistance of a dentist and another medical professional, a speech pathologist is actually quite credible for therapy. Because they spend their careers dedicated to refining speech, their therapeutic approach can be helpful for addressing OMD. To find out more about orofacial myofunctional therapy or to get scheduled for a consultation appointment, reach out today.

Request an appointment here: https://smalltalktherapyservices.com or call Small Talk Therapy Services at (832) 900-1198 for an appointment in our Richmond office.

Check out what others are saying about our services on Yelp: Read our Yelp reviews.

Recent Posts

Speech Pathology, Autism And Pragmatics Therapy

Pragmatics therapy is an approach that speech-language pathologists and other medical professionals use to treat individuals who struggle with communication skills. Additionally, individuals that are autistic often undergo pragmatics therapy, as it is proven to be a successful way to improve and refine behavioral skills. Continue reading to find out more. Below is an overview of…

Understanding Social Skills Development For Autism

Social skills development for autism is a big part of managing individuals who suffer from the disorder. Autism is a result of a lack of development in the brain, which almost always translates to social skills, such as communicating and interacting. This can make it especially challenging for autistic individuals to have any exposure to…

What Is Pragmatics Therapy For Autism?

Pragmatics therapy for autism is an approach that relies on pragmatic language, a sector of speech pathology. This method is used to support the growth of patients with an autism diagnosis can be quite beneficial for caretakers, peers, and the individual themselves. While there are a lot of ways to treat individuals with autism, pragmatics…

When Should Social Skills Development For Autism Begin?

Wondering when to start social skills development for autism? This is a great question that a lot of speech-language pathologists come across when administering therapy. However, there is not a clear-cut answer. Instead, the answer varies based on a few factors. Nonetheless, it is important to become familiar with the possibilities. Continue reading to find…

Recent Posts

Speech Pathology, Autism And Pragmatics Therapy

Speech Pathology, Autism And Pragmatics Therapy

Pragmatics therapy is an approach that speech-language pathologists and other medical professionals use to treat individuals who struggle with communication skills. Additionally, individuals that are autistic often undergo pragmatics therapy, as it is proven to be a successful way to improve and refine behavioral skills. Continue reading to find out more. Below is an overview of…

Understanding Social Skills Development  For Autism

Understanding Social Skills Development For Autism

Social skills development for autism is a big part of managing individuals who suffer from the disorder. Autism is a result of a lack of development in the brain, which almost always translates to social skills, such as communicating and interacting. This can make it especially challenging for autistic individuals to have any exposure to…